The Building Of Newton Abbot’s Market

Gilbert Yarde inherited the markets and Bradley Manor from Walter Yarde and he built an undercover market in Wolborough Street. Wool continued to be the main commodity with Newton Bushel reputed for producers of Kersey (Coarse Woollen Cloth) or Serge.

Sheep

Sheep

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Newton Abbot Market History

John Gaverock (c1533) had three daughters Elizabeth, Alice and Susan. After the death of John Gaverock they sold part of their inheritance to the Yarde family. In 1633 Richard Yarde was responsible for amalgamating the two markets and fairs and from then on the larger combined Wednesday market was held in Wolborough Street, flourishing as one body. The Market House was at the west end of St. Leonard’s and was moved in 1826. Sheep, pigs and cattle stood right up through Wolborough Street and the bull ring was opposite 27 Wolborough Street. As a result the Market site on Triangle Hill in Newton Bushell fell into decline.

Newton Abbot Cattle Market

Newton Abbot Cattle Market


Wolborough Street

John Gaverock lived in the manor house in Wolborough Street until he owned the town and then he built Forde House and became known as John Gaverock of Forde.

Wolborough Street

Wolborough Street


Newton Abbot Streets

Newton Abbot had three main streets, Bridge Street, Wolborough Street, and East Street. Courtenay Street and Queen Street grew later leading down to the marshes. Following the arrival of the railway in 1846, access to the station became a priority. Poverty and squalor was commonplace with lack of sanitation and open-range fires until the planners had their way and in Victorian times the market square was reputed to be a place of Victorian elegance. Today the town centre retains some remnants of its past glories such as St. Leonard’s Tower at the junctions of Wolborough Street, Bank Street and East Street.

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