Sir William Waller

William Waller married Jane Reynell, daughter of Sir Richard and Lucy Reynell and inherited Forde House. In the 17th Century a battle took place to gain control of the Market between Sir William Waller and the Yardes of Bradley with the control remaining with the Yardes, showing the importance of wool to the area.

Sir William Waller

Sir William Waller

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Newton Abbot Market History

John Gaverock (c1533) had three daughters Elizabeth, Alice and Susan. After the death of John Gaverock they sold part of their inheritance to the Yarde family. In 1633 Richard Yarde was responsible for amalgamating the two markets and fairs and from then on the larger combined Wednesday market was held in Wolborough Street, flourishing as one body. The Market House was at the west end of St. Leonard’s and was moved in 1826. Sheep, pigs and cattle stood right up through Wolborough Street and the bull ring was opposite 27 Wolborough Street. As a result the Market site on Triangle Hill in Newton Bushell fell into decline.

Newton Abbot Cattle Market

Newton Abbot Cattle Market


Newton Abbot’s Wednesday Market

King Henry III in 1220 granted a Charter for a Wednesday Market.

Newton Abbot Markets

Newton Abbot Markets


The Beginning Of Highweek

As the child heir to the Manor of Teignwick was brought up with his guardians at Bradley Manor, the defensive castle at Teignwick was no longer needed and fell into disrepair and the Bushels developed the older settlement in the valley, on the north banks of the River Lemon.

Teignwick name was then changed to Highweek and the new Lord of the Manor’s territory was thought to be known as Schirebourne Newton, “new village beside a clear stream”, and a mill developed called Sherbourne Mill, which was functioning until the 1930s, when it was demolished to make way for the new cattle market on Sherbourne Road.

Sherbourne Road

Sherbourne Road