Sir William Waller

William Waller married Jane Reynell, daughter of Sir Richard and Lucy Reynell and inherited Forde House. In the 17th Century a battle took place to gain control of the Market between Sir William Waller and the Yardes of Bradley with the control remaining with the Yardes, showing the importance of wool to the area.

Sir William Waller

Sir William Waller

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Sir Richard Reynell

Sir Richard Reynell was a lawyer and officer of the Court of Exchequer and was married to Lucy Brandon, daughter of the Chamberlain of the City of London. By 1610 Sir Richard Reynell acquired Forde Manor from the daughters John Graverock’s daughters who also disposed of the whole of the estate of Wolborough Manor.

Sir Richard Reynell

Sir Richard Reynell


Manor of Teignwick

By 1533 Bradley Manor and the Manor of Teignwick had passed to Thomas Yarde and when John Gaverock died Thomas Yarde acquired control of  the Manor and Borough of Newton Abbot at a cost of £284 0s 11d.

Teignwick and Newton Abbot

Teignwick and Newton Abbot


Wolborough Street

John Gaverock lived in the manor house in Wolborough Street until he owned the town and then he built Forde House and became known as John Gaverock of Forde.

Wolborough Street

Wolborough Street


John Gaverock of Newton Abbot

In 1539 King Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries and as a consequence the Abbots lost control of Newton Abbot. In 1545 the town of Newton Abbot came into the possession of John Gaverock, a former Abbot’s steward for a cost of £592 14s 2d, and the King was satisfied with his credentials and thereafter the town was in private hands. John Gaverock built a new manorial home at Forde.

Forde House

Forde House

Forde, Newton Abbot

Forde, Newton Abbot


Fellmongering In Newton Abbot

On the north side of the River Lemon lies Bradley Manor and after the male line of the Bushels died out in 1402 the manor was in the possession of the Yarde family. Wool was important as there were six mills on the estate, three fellmongering (stripping the wool from a sheep) mills and three corn mills.

Fellmongering

Fellmongering


St Leonard’s Tower, Newton Abbot

Photochrom print by Photoglob Zürich, between ...

Photochrom print by Photoglob Zürich, between 1890 and 1900. From the Photochrom Prints Collection at the Library of Congress More photochroms from England | More photochrom prints [PD] This picture is in the public domain (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

St. Leonard was the Patron Saint of Prisoners and this is probably why churches in the area were so named, in gratitude for the release of King Richard I following payment of the ransom, and subsequent release of the rest of the hostages. St. Leonard’s Tower is all that remains of St. Leonard’s Church in Newton Abbot and is a listed building. Church of St Leonard, Newton Abbot Details.

St. Leonard's, Wolborough,  Newton Abbot

St. Leonard’s, Wolborough, Newton Abbot