Leather Industry In Newton Abbot

Aligned with the wool industry the leather industry also thrived in Newton Abbot as shown in an agreement in 1580 between John Hayman and Richard Haymen. Another family which helped the leather trade to flourish were the Vicarys. The industry was still thriving circa 1800 when Moses Vicary was married to Rebecca Duke, a daughter of a wealthy boot and shoe merchant and the Vicary families helped the town to prosper, despite the ceasing of the manufacture in Newton Bushel of serge by 1805.

Leather

Leather

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Sir William Waller

William Waller married Jane Reynell, daughter of Sir Richard and Lucy Reynell and inherited Forde House. In the 17th Century a battle took place to gain control of the Market between Sir William Waller and the Yardes of Bradley with the control remaining with the Yardes, showing the importance of wool to the area.

Sir William Waller

Sir William Waller


The Building Of Newton Abbot’s Market

Gilbert Yarde inherited the markets and Bradley Manor from Walter Yarde and he built an undercover market in Wolborough Street. Wool continued to be the main commodity with Newton Bushel reputed for producers of Kersey (Coarse Woollen Cloth) or Serge.

Sheep

Sheep


Newton Abbot Market History

John Gaverock (c1533) had three daughters Elizabeth, Alice and Susan. After the death of John Gaverock they sold part of their inheritance to the Yarde family. In 1633 Richard Yarde was responsible for amalgamating the two markets and fairs and from then on the larger combined Wednesday market was held in Wolborough Street, flourishing as one body. The Market House was at the west end of St. Leonard’s and was moved in 1826. Sheep, pigs and cattle stood right up through Wolborough Street and the bull ring was opposite 27 Wolborough Street. As a result the Market site on Triangle Hill in Newton Bushell fell into decline.

Newton Abbot Cattle Market

Newton Abbot Cattle Market