Sir Richard Reynell

Sir Richard Reynell was a lawyer and officer of the Court of Exchequer and was married to Lucy Brandon, daughter of the Chamberlain of the City of London. By 1610 Sir Richard Reynell acquired Forde Manor from the daughters John Graverock’s daughters who also disposed of the whole of the estate of Wolborough Manor.

Sir Richard Reynell

Sir Richard Reynell

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John Gaverock of Newton Abbot

In 1539 King Henry VIII dissolved the monasteries and as a consequence the Abbots lost control of Newton Abbot. In 1545 the town of Newton Abbot came into the possession of John Gaverock, a former Abbot’s steward for a cost of £592 14s 2d, and the King was satisfied with his credentials and thereafter the town was in private hands. John Gaverock built a new manorial home at Forde.

Forde House

Forde House

Forde, Newton Abbot

Forde, Newton Abbot


History Of Markets In Newton Abbot

Teignwick Manor was granted a Charter in 1246 for a weekly market on Triangle Hill and a further Charter was granted in 1331. In the 13th century, Teignwick Manor was renamed Newton Bushel, after Robert Bushel, who was then Lord of the Manor. Also four consecutive days of fairs twice a year were also granted on the feasts of Ascension and All Saints. At the markets and fairs were local produce, wares and cloths from traders in the surrounding area, together with entertainment such as plays, racing, wrestling and dancing.

Wool Market

Wool Market


Wolborough And The Birth Of Newton Abbot

On the South side of the River Lemon further development took place in Wolborough, which had existed before the Domesday record and it is thought the Manor House was located on the site of Wolborough Barton, on the hill beside Wolborough Church.

Wolborough records go back to the reign of King Richard I, who was imprisoned by Leopold, Duke of Austria who demanded a ransom.

William Brewer inherited Wolborough Manor from his father Ralph de Bruere.

William Brewer was the Lord of the Manor of Torre and Justiciar and had the responsibility to raise the money for the King’s ransom. William was only able to raise 70,000 Marks, so the Duke of Austria demanded 67 hostages from the nobility of England to guarantee the remainder of the ransom of 150,000 Marks. William Brewer’s son was one of the hostages.

The Duke of Austria was fatally wounded; fortunately the Austrian Church had previously persuaded the Duke to release the captives, even though the full ransom had not been paid. Consequently, the Austrian Church sent representatives to Torbay in 1196 and they were allowed to construct Torre Abbey on land owned by William Brewer to be occupied by the Austrian Abbots of Torre, with financial support from William Brewer.

From then on the Manor of Wolborough became known as the new town of Abbot, hence Newton Abbot.

St. Paul's Church, Wolborough, Newton Abbot

St. Paul’s Church, Wolborough, Newton Abbot